Cherokee Street Gallery

THE LATEST

UP NEXT... JEREMY RABUS

An Exhibition of New Works by Jeremy Rabus Opens 8/10/19

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Saturday, August 10th from 6 to 9 pm Cherokee Street Gallery is hosting an opening reception exhibition of new artwork by Jeremy Rabus. Refreshments will be provided by Urban Chestnut Brewery. This art opening is in conjunction with Cherokee Street's 2nd Saturday festivities, so there'll be a lot happening up and down the block. "We are excited about this show. Jeremy's abstract compositions of gestural strokes express an emergent joy through their vibrant color palette, drawing viewers into ever deepening levels of discovery," says Cherokee Street Gallery Founder, Benjamin Lowder. "Jeremy has been creating some gorgeous new work from his studio here on Cherokee Street and we are very pleased to have him in the neighborhood." Jeremy shared that "I enthusiastically accepted Ben’s invite to show new works at Cherokee Street Gallery, and am absolutely excited to share these fresh paintings, collages, and sculptures with the arts community on this eclectic street. In January of this year, I made the move of securing a new studio, my third space on the famous Cherokee Street... I signed the lease that would return me to the world of Cherokee Street, it’s community, it’s DIY concerns, and it’s galleries."

Ben Lowder
One Year Anniversary Party
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Please Join us on Saturday, July 13th from 6 to 9pm for the Cherokee Street Gallery one year anniversary celebration and exhibition. This event is part of Cherokee Street's 2nd Saturday Art Walk, featuring artwork by Kool Koor, Lauren Marx, Travis Lawrence, Al Diaz, Jerald Ieans, Zack Smithey, Robert Longyear, Bryan Walsh, L. A. Marler, Benjamin Lowder and more. Refreshments are provided by Urban Chestnut Brewery, plus a special rum tasting from Nobletons Distillery. Nobletons will be sampling their rum varieties, signature mojitos and daiquiris.

Ben Lowder
TEXT CON TEXT

The “Text Con Text” exhibition at Cherokee Street Gallery was a group show featuring all text based artwork from artists Bryan Walsh, Robert Longyear, L. A. Marler and Benjamin Lowder.

Bryan Walsh

Bryan Walsh

Robert Longyear

Robert Longyear

L. A. Marler

L. A. Marler

Benjamin Lowder

Benjamin Lowder

Ben Lowder
SUPER BLOOM

“Super Bloom” is an explosion of flower-like geometric assemblages based on a 2-D version of Buckminster Fuller's geodesic dome geometry, built from reclaimed wood and vintage metal signage by artist Benjamin Lowder, happening now through May 10th.

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Ben Lowder
MILES TONES 2019 Fundraiser for Miles Davis' Historic Home
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Cherokee Street Gallery is hosting a fundraiser for the House of Miles East St. Louis.

Featuring a performance by musician Tonina & artwork by Kool Koor & Benjamin Lowder

Saturday, March 9th from 6 to 8pm at Cherokee Street Gallery

2617 Cherokee Street • St. Louis MO 63118

The House of Miles East St. Louis is a nonprofit organization located in Miles Davis’ historic childhood home in East St. louis, Illinois and it is known by the acronym H.O.M.E. They are engaged in a dual mission of maintaining this important cultural landmark as well as offering love and encouragement to the children of East St Louis through supportive programing offered at the H.O.M.E. “This is the kind of cultural stewardship we are proud to throw our support behind,”  said artist and Cherokee Street Gallery Founder, Benjamin Lowder. “The House of Miles East St. Louis is not just looking to preserve the past, they are building an enriched future on the foundation of Miles Davis’ legacy in East St. Louis.”

artists to be featured at the “Miles Tones” fundraiser at Cherokee Street Gallery Saturday 3/9/19

artists to be featured at the “Miles Tones” fundraiser at Cherokee Street Gallery Saturday 3/9/19

The event will feature Miles Davis inspired artwork by artists Kool Koor and Benjamin Lowder being sold that evening to benefit the House of Miles East St Louis. The artworks being offered for the benefit of H.O.M.E. will range from large original pieces to limited edition posters. Also that evening, jazz musician and St. Louis native, Tonina Saputo will be playing live in the gallery. Former President Barack Obama personally named Tonina’s song “Historia De Un Amor” to his list of “Favorite Songs of 2018.” The name given to this event, “Miles Tones,” draws from the title of a piece of artwork created by Kool Koor after he and Lowder visited Miles Davis’ house in East St Louis. Admission is free, donations are encouraged, come join the celebration. Contact: cherokeestreetgallery@hotmail.com

Lowder (L) and KOOR (R) pictured in front of Kool Koor’s artwork titled “Miles’ Tones”

Lowder (L) and KOOR (R) pictured in front of Kool Koor’s artwork titled “Miles’ Tones”

Ben Lowder
KOOL KOOR

KOOL KOOR Building "Sanctuary" in St Louis

Kool Koor traveled from Brussel, Belgium to St Louis to create a powerful new body of artwork for his solo show opening at Cherokee Street Gallery on Saturday, November 3rd with an artist talk at 6PM and reception to follow.

Ben Lowderkool koor, street art
Halloween Show

Exercise Your Demons

It was a blast exhibiting work by St Louis artists Lauren Marx, Jason Spencer, Rebecca Bolte and Dan Mutchler for the Cherokee Street Gallery Halloween show titled “Exercise Your Demons.” The week long exhibition climaxed with a live performance by Rebecca Bolte’s band “Red Bait.”

Ben Lowder
Patti Astor Takes Over
Patti Astor and Benjamin Lowder 2017 NYC, Urban Art Fair, “Fun Gallery Flash”

Patti Astor and Benjamin Lowder 2017 NYC, Urban Art Fair, “Fun Gallery Flash”

Patti Astor is taking over Cherokee Street Gallery to share her incredible journey through the formation of the Hip Hop, Punk Rock, New Wave and Underground Film scenes of the late 1970’s to early 1980’s New York City. Astor will be at Cherokee Street Gallery on Friday, October 12th for an opening reception at 7:00 pm to present her personal collection of artifacts and ephemera from her legendary Fun Gallery days as well as her career staring in landmark art films. She will also share her amazing first hand experiences in a talk at Cherokee Street Gallery on Saturday, October 13 beginning at 6:oo pm.

Through her film career Patti Astor earned a reputation as the "Queen of The Downtown Screen" acting along-side people like Rene Ricard and Debbie Harry from the band Blondie. She appeared in early and influential art films by directors such as Jim Jarmusch, Eric Mitchel, Amos Poe and Charlie Ahearn. Astor is most well-known, as an actress, for her starring role in Charlie Ahrean’s 1982 movie Wildstyle, which was the first feature film to document Hip Hop culture.

Along with her film career, Astor opened Fun Gallery, with Bill Stelling, in the desolate East Village neighborhood of New York City. Through her pioneering efforts at Fun Gallery, from 1981 to 1985, Astor curated what has become the most important roster of American artists in recent history including Jean Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, Jane Dickson, Kenny Scharf and “Dondi” White among others. Astor serves as a Curatorial Advisor for Cherokee Street Gallery, a role that grew out of Astor’s inclusion of the gallery’s founder and artist Benjamin Lowder in her roster of contemporary artists that she calls her “Fun Gallery Crew.” Lowder says, “Patti Astor is one of a very small group of individuals who were at the creative nexus in New York City that yielded a globally transformative American cultural movement not seen since the Jazz age. This is an important opportunity for St. Louis to witness living history.” 

Ben Lowder
Al Diaz, coming to Cherokee Street Gallery

SAMO©... LIVES

Artist Al Diaz to exhibit at Cherokee Street Gallery

New York City artist, Al Diaz is coming to St Louis to open an exhibition of his current artwork at Cherokee Street Gallery on Saturday, September 8th. The exhibition is titled “SAMO© LIVES” and opens at the gallery with an artist talk by Diaz from 6:00 to 7:00 pm followed by an opening reception beginning at 7:00 pm.

“I’m psyched about showing theses new pieces. I’ve been preparing all summer for the Cherokee Street Gallery show.  St. Louis is proving to be a Street Art Destination.” - Al Diaz

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Al Diaz and Jean Michel Basquiat collaborated on the creation of the enigmatic graffiti tag "SAMO©", pronounced "same oh" as in "same 'ol shit" or "same 'ol thing." It was a blasé expression of boredom in reaction to the repeated patterns of daily activity offered by modern life. Diaz and Basquiat worked to build the SAMO© concept by writing short cryptic slogans on the streets of New York City from 1977 to early 1980 tagged with the name SAMO©. According to Diaz, "SAMO© was never intended to be a person." Cherokee Street Gallery Founder, Benjamin Lowder’s take on SAMO© is that, “it was meant to be a brand or place holder for the empty promises presented by religion and consumer culture.” Basquiat took over the SAMO© identity for a while as his art-world alter ego, but Diaz says it was never intended to be that and he presents an alternative viewpoint of what the enigmatic SAMO© actually was. 

August marks the 30th anniversary of Basquiat’s death and the Contemporary Art Museum St Louis is mounting an exhibition titled “Basquiat Before Basquiat” focusing on the same years that Diaz and Basquiat created SAMO© together. Cherokee Street Gallery Manager Lisa Simani says, “it’s fortuitous timing that brings these two exhibitions together here in St Louis to present a more complete picture of this culturally significant collaboration between Diaz and Basquiat.”

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Cherokee Street Gallery • 2617 Cherokee Street, St Louis • www.CherokeeStreetGallery.com

Contact: info@cherokeestreetgallery.com

 

Ben Lowder
Artist Talk with Benjamin Lowder

"Messages From Mercury"

An artist talk at Cherokee Street Gallery by Benjamin Lowder

Saturday, September 1st at 4:00 PM

Cherokee Street Gallery artist and founder, Benjamin Lowder shares the inspiration behind his "Myth, Math & Magic" series of artwork. Benjamin will be focusing on the thread of thought that lead him to the new work appearing in the "Messages From Mercury" exhibition.

Topic areas will include: 

Hermes Trismegistus • Sacred Geometry • Word Magic • Semiotics • Mythology • Alchemy 

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Artworks currently on view at Cherokee Street Gallery as part of "Messages From Mercury"

Scenes from our inaugural opening

Cherokee Street Gallery's inaugural exhibition "Messages From Mercury" featuring new artwork by the gallery's founder Benjamin Lowder opened to a packed house along with works by artists Jerald Ieans, Zack Smithey, Travis Lawrence and Lauren Marx. photos by Rebecca Bolte

SEE YA ON JUNE 29th
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Cherokee Street Gallery, located at 2617 Cherokee Street in St Louis, presents it’s first official art opening on Friday, June 29th with a reception from 6 - 10 pm. The show is titled “Messages From Mercury” and features artwork by the gallery’s founder, Benjamin Lowder. Lowder says, “our inaugural show’s title draws from the mythological idea that the planet Mercury, being the closest planet to the sun, functions as the messenger between worlds and presents itself to human beings as the mythological character Hermes. This archetypal character deals with language and travel, functioning as a scribe to communicate the source of creation’s will to humanity in order to guide us on the right path.” Through the use of objects like deconstructed caution barricades, Lowder’s current artwork is using this mythological narrative as an allegory to express the idea that we are in danger of loosing touch with our guiding archetypal forces and this disconnection could cause us to “go the wrong way.” Lowder says “this message from mercury is essentially a call for us to acknowledge our hubris.”

In addition to Lowder’s “Messages From Mercury” show, the gallery will also be exhibiting the artwork of two other talented and popular St Louis artists. Cherokee Street Gallery’s, managing gallerist, Lisa Simani said, “during our inaugural exhibition we are also placing artwork by Jerald Ieans and Zack Smithey in conversation with each other. Both of these artists have uniquely strong voices and in considering their work, it seemed to us, that their artworks were having a dialogue with each other.” Both of these artists utilize fluid biomorphic shapes that play with the viewers perception of these shapes in relation to themselves and the background in which they’ve been placed. The artwork in this show will be on view at Cherokee Street Gallery through the months of July and August. During this show’s run the gallery will also be periodically showcasing other artistic mediums such as fashion design, dance, music and designer furnishings.

Cherokee Street Gallery’s next show will feature the artwork of Al Diaz and it is set to open on Saturday, September 8th, 2018. Al Diaz and Jean Michel Basquiat collaborated on the creation of the enigmatic graffiti tag "SAMO©", pronounced "same oh" as in "same 'ol shit" or "same 'ol thing." Diaz and Basquiat worked to build the SAMO© concept by writing short cryptic slogans on the streets of New York City from 1977 to early 1980 which they tagged with the name SAMO©. According to Diaz, "SAMO© was never intended to be a person." It was meant to be a brand or place holder for the empty promises presented by religion and consumer culture. Basquiat took over the SAMO© identity for a while as his art world alter ego, but Diaz says it was never intended to be that and he presents an alternative viewpoint of what the enigmatic SAMO© actually was. 

STAY TUNED!

What's Up With That Sign???
The Cherokee Street Gallery sign, a nod to the iconic NYC Subway graphics

The Cherokee Street Gallery sign, a nod to the iconic NYC Subway graphics

The Cherokee Street Gallery signage is a reference to the 1970 New York City, Transit Authority, Graphics Standards Manual, Designed by Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda.

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If you found yourself in the New York City subway in the 1960s, you were probably lost, and by the year 1970, the Standards Manual changed everything. the New York City Transit Authority hired Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda of the design firm Unimark International to design a signage and wayfinding system that could solve this complex communication challenge. Vignelli and Noorda met this daunting design challenge by creating, the 1970 New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual, which has since become an iconic example of modern design.

A whole subway car "burner" done by Dondi White juxtaposed with NYCTA signage.

A whole subway car "burner" done by Dondi White juxtaposed with NYCTA signage.

In the late 1970's and early 1980's the NYC Subway system was used as a meeting place, studio and canvas for young graffiti writers. The creative lighting that struck there, at that place, in that time, electrified the minds of New York city's youth. They were creating art outside of the law and outside the halls of the establishment. It was from that energy that Hip Hop culture was brought to life and it has since become the dominant form of creative expression around the world today.

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Legendary artist and myth-maker, Rammellzee drew a large degree of inspiration from the subway system and he claimed that his Wild Style graffiti letters were "weapons" who's stylistic form, had been shaped "in the wind tunnels of the transit system." Rammellzee's pivotal insight was that symbols and language shape our reality and that through the control of society's agreed upon symbols, an artist can operate at the causal level and actively shape reality. He was also very aware of the ongoing battle raging among the symbols, logos and language of competing corporations and governments for control of our collective reality. It was in light of this war for our collective hearts and minds that Rammellzee armed his letters with an array of weaponry. Artist Dondi White, repeated Rammellzee's philosophy regarding the need to "arm letters" by quoting Rammellzee's thesis stating,

"the only way to destroy a symbol is with a symbol."

The iconic subway signage created by Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noord as well as the graffiti art that originated at the same time in that same subway system both deal in the use and manipulation of symbols to convey meaning. The way in which we attribute meaning to the symbols systems of art and design is a fascinating area of study know as semiotics. This, simply put, is the study of meaning-making and it is a tool for analysis we employ at the gallery. This confluence of meaning, iconography and art occurring in the New York subway system made the NYCTA signage a perfect visual reference point for the kind of ideas we will be exploring at Cherokee Street Gallery as we curate artwork that evokes the miracle of the natural world through humanity‘s distilled symbolic language.

Cherokee Street Gallery takes it's name from it's location and Cherokee Street takes it's name from the lost Cherokee Cave network that still exists beneath the street's pavement. Although access to the cave has been lost, the mystery and power associated with this fabled system of caverns still defines the area through the legends of native americans who revered it as a sacred place, to the breweries it brought to St. Louis in the 1800's who used the caves for refrigeration. The subterranean geology of this cave network, known to geologists as a "karst region," has defined the history and current character of St. Louis. 

In a similar way the subterranean architecture of the New York Subway System has defined the character of New York City, and as the most influential city in the 20th Century, New York has largely defined our current global culture. The inherited letter forms that were appropriated and abstracted by New York graffiti writers share an architecture with the natural growth structures they were based upon as humanity began to use symbols to stand for actual things. This nexus of nature informing symbols to shape global culture is referenced in the Cherokee Street Gallery sign which is an iconographic reference to the 1970 style manual for the New York city subway system signage. 

Cherokee Street Gallery Founder,

Benjamin Lowder

SAMO© LIVES with Al Diaz

Al Diaz is coming to Cherokee Gallery

Al Diaz putting up a SAMO tag in NYC

Al Diaz putting up a SAMO tag in NYC

Al Diaz and Jean Michel Basquiat collaborated on the creation of the enigmatic graffiti tag "SAMO©", pronounced "same oh" as in "same 'ol shit" or "same 'ol thing." It was a blasé expression of boredom in reaction to the repeated patterns of daily activity offered by modern life. Diaz and Basquiat worked to build the SAMO© concept by writing short cryptic slogans on the streets of New York City from 1977 to early 1980 tagged with the name SAMO©. According to Diaz, "SAMO© was never intended to be a person." It was meant to be a brand or place holder for the empty promises presented by religion and consumer culture. Basquiat took over the SAMO© identity for a while as his art world alter ego, but Diaz says it was never intended to be that and he presents an alternative viewpoint of what the enigmatic SAMO© actually was. 

vintage NYC SAMO tag Photo by Henry Flynt

vintage NYC SAMO tag Photo by Henry Flynt

An Al Diaz "SAMO Cross" Tag in the NYC Subway.

An Al Diaz "SAMO Cross" Tag in the NYC Subway.

Cherokee Street Gallery is having Al Diaz come to St Louis this September to exhibit work and share his perspective on SAMO© "As an end to mindwash religion, nowhere politics and bogus philosophies."

Albert Diaz explains how SAMO came about and how he and Jean Basquiat created the world renowned brand, including how reports of it's death were misunderstood.