Cherokee Street Gallery

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  2617 Cherokee Street • St. Louis    •    Artist: Benjamin Lowder    •    Photo: Dave Cain

2617 Cherokee Street • St. Louis    •    Artist: Benjamin Lowder    •    Photo: Dave Cain

“We will curate artwork that evokes the miracle of the natural world through humanity‘s distilled symbolic language,”

  The Cherokee Street Jazz Crawl passes the gallery each November

The Cherokee Street Jazz Crawl passes the gallery each November

  2017 New York Exhibition curated by Patti Astor featuring artists Benjamin Lowder & Kool Koor

2017 New York Exhibition curated by Patti Astor featuring artists Benjamin Lowder & Kool Koor

  Vintage Cherokee Cave postcard

Vintage Cherokee Cave postcard

St. Louis, MO - Cherokee Street Gallery, St. Louis’ most anticipated new gallery, is open at 2617 Cherokee Street with a preview of the space currently on view and an inaugural exhibition set for Friday, June 29th, 2018.

Cherokee Street Gallery will be hosting exhibitions that explore the intersection of nature and iconography. “We will curate artwork that evokes the miracle of the natural world through humanity‘s distilled symbolic language,” says gallery founder and artist Benjamin Lowder.

Art world legend, Patti Astor, joins Lowder as the Gallery’s Curatorial Advisor. Patti will bring her significant experience to St. Louis, having curated shows in the 1980’s by Futura, Dondi White, Kenny Scharf, Keith Haring and Jean Michel Basquiat at her New York City based, Fun Gallery.“

Cherokee Street Gallery will launch with an exhibition from the gallery’s founder Benjamin Lowder on Friday, June 29th, from 6:00 - 10:00 pm. This exhibition will be a continuation of Lowder’s “Myth, Math & Magic” series of artwork that consists of remixed cultural artifacts. Patti Astor says of Lowder’s work, “...great art shares a secret but reveals its existence. Each of Benjamin Lowder's pieces not only invite us to share the adventure they hold within, they also inspire us to imagine our own.”

The artwork we curate will be diverse,” according to Cherokee Street Gallery’s Gallerist, Lisa Simani, “It is the gallery's intent to keep humanity's use of symbols to com- municate our relationship with nature as a uniting thread throughout our programing.” 

Cherokee Street Gallery takes it's name from it's location and Cherokee Street takes it's name from the lost Cherokee Cave network that still exists beneath the street's pavement. Although access to the cave has been lost, the mystery and power associated with this fabled system of caverns still defines the area through the legends of native americans who revered it as a sacred place, to the breweries it brought to St. Louis in the 1800's who used the caves for refrigeration. The subterranean geology of this cave network, known to geologists as a "karst region," has defined the history and current character of St. Louis. This relationship between nature, in the form of these caves and their influence on the mythic identity of a city is a perfect example of the intersection between nature and symbols that we hope to explore.

In a similar way the subterranean architecture of the New York Subway System has defined the character of New York City, and as the most influential city in the 20th Century, New York has largely defined our current global culture. It is from the man-made caverns of the New York subway system that graffiti writing emerged, birthing Hip Hop culture, which has gone on to become a globally dominant form of creative expression. The inherited letter forms that were appropriated and abstracted by New York graffiti writers share an architecture with the natural growth structures they were based upon at their origin as humanity began to use symbols to stand for actual things. This nexus of nature informing symbols to shape global culture is referenced in the Cherokee Street Gallery sign which is an iconographic reference to the 1980 style manual for the New York city subway system signage. 

CHEROKEE STREET GALLERY EXHIBITIONS: